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Post Info TOPIC: Good times.


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Life before fast food restaurants were mainstream.

m7jj3tz450h41.jpg?width=960&auto=webp&s=

 

Looks like my family when we moved to Florida.

smile

 



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Dee


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Looks like my family but half the size and our earliest station wagon was a red Chevy loaded with chrome inside and out. As a little kid I was impressed Dad bought a red car, but alas it didn't last long. Almost immediately he traded it in for a white one.  I loved that red car, i cried when I found out it was gone. You know, I don't think I ever really recovered. no 





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Ours looked exactly like this one. Red would have been cool. My father was not cool.

 



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Dee


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nytram wrote:

Ours looked exactly like this one. Red would have been cool. My father was not cool.

 


 My dad wasn't cool either, it was so out of character for him to buy a red car.  I should have known it wouldn't last.



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Either color is better than the wood paneling they put on these wagons in the 80s.

 



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After my sister was born (1951), I remember a few road trips to Michigan, in the days before the interstates. Probably on U.S. 12.
But I don't recall any roadside picnics or stops at "waysides" (little rest stops along state highways...Ohio still has some. They're pretty cool...)
Eating outside? Next to the highway? Jews don't do that. Just like they tend not to drink, either. smile biggrin smile

Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Saturday 15th of February 2020 12:41:12 AM

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KidCharlieMane wrote:

After my sister was born (1951), I remember a few road trips to Michigan, in the days before the interstates. Probably on U.S. 12.
But I don't recall any roadside picnics or stops at "waysides" (little rest stops along state highways...Ohio still has some. They're pretty cool...)
Eating outside? Next to the highway? Jews don't do that. Just like they tend not to drink, either. smile biggrin smile

Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Saturday 15th of February 2020 12:41:12 AM


Illinois has what they call an "oasis" where the rest stop is situated directly over the highway. It's kinda fun.



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ghostal wrote:
KidCharlieMane wrote:

After my sister was born (1951), I remember a few road trips to Michigan, in the days before the interstates. Probably on U.S. 12.
But I don't recall any roadside picnics or stops at "waysides" (little rest stops along state highways...Ohio still has some. They're pretty cool...)
Eating outside? Next to the highway? Jews don't do that. Just like they tend not to drink, either. smile biggrin smile

Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Saturday 15th of February 2020 12:41:12 AM


Illinois has what they call an "oasis" where the rest stop is situated directly over the highway. It's kinda fun.


 Yeah, I grew up with those. They are over the Illinois Tollway...north, northwest, and west of Chicago. Maybe south, too.

They were first opened in the late Fifties. Their food was always meh. evileye

Charlie

 



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KidCharlieMane wrote:
 Yeah, I grew up with those. They are over the Illinois Tollway...north, northwest, and west of Chicago. Maybe south, too.

They were first opened in the late Fifties. Their food was always meh. evileye

Charlie

 


The O'hara and Des Plaines Oasis's are gone. I'm not sure if the Hinsdale oasis is still there but if it is it wont be for long. Not sure what the fate of the other four will be.



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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_Tollway_oasis

There's a Wikipedia page for them.



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History: http://www.panix.com/~rbean/oasis/



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Dee


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We didn't even have toll roads or lanes until.. not very long ago, can't remember now. Not long anyway. The whole idea of toll roads was always bizarre to us. We had a few bridge tolls, but that was it, and once the bridge was paid for, the tolls stopped. Now we have toll lanes around much of the Puget Sound region for solo drivers, 2+ are usually free. The only toll road is just the new tunnel that runs under downtown Seattle.

Years ago when I went to Disney World in Florida, it was my first experience driving on toll roads. Driving between the airport and our Disney World hotel I lost track of how many times I had to stop to toss coins. I made a mental note to never live in an area with toll roads.

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Dee wrote:

We didn't even have toll roads or lanes until.. not very long ago, can't remember now. Not long anyway. The whole idea of toll roads was always bizarre to us. We had a few bridge tolls, but that was it, and once the bridge was paid for, the tolls stopped. Now we have toll lanes around much of the Puget Sound region for solo drivers, 2+ are usually free. The only toll road is just the new tunnel that runs under downtown Seattle.

Years ago when I went to Disney World in Florida, it was my first experience driving on toll roads. Driving between the airport and our Disney World hotel I lost track of how many times I had to stop to toss coins. I made a mental note to never live in an area with toll roads.


 I distinctly remember all the 1958 promises that once the toll roads in the Chicaog area were paid for, they'd become freeways. Hell, all that noise became bullshit and hot air after a few years, when the state realized how much big money came from all those fifty-cent tolls thrown into the hoppers at the toll booths. The tolls stayed at that level for many, many years, but then began to go up...and more toll booths were built.

Now you can put a gizmo on your car that lets you whiz through and bills you later, or deducts the money from your account or your bank or wherever. It's called an E-Z Pass. Ohio and PA have them, and so do many other states, including Indiana and Illinois. We have never used one, because we don't use turnpikes and toll roads enough to make them worth our while. We just use cash, same as always.

One time we went up to Minnesota, and when we came back and hit the Ohio line, we found out that while we were away, the tolls had DOUBLED. So we had to find an ATM in order to get home.

On our last Minnesota trip, we had to stop NINE times to pay tolls in order to pass through the Chicago area. We paid more for that approximately 75-mile ride than we paid to pass through entire states. 

If you want to know what the term "highway robbery" really means, just try passing through northeastern Illinois in order to go from Indiana to Wisconsin. Also, it takes forever. So the best way is to go way west of Chicago and then turn north. It adds a lot of time and mileage, but you save a lot of money and hassle. Illinois is one of the most corrupt states. I always just say I'm from Chicago, never from Illinois.

Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Sunday 16th of February 2020 10:20:23 AM

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Dee


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I have one of those gizmo toll passes on my windshield. Here in Washington it is call "Good To Go!". I rarely use it to drive solo in the HOV lane, unless the other lanes are a parking lot, but I usually don't drive in peak hours. Some lanes (I-405) require it to drive free in the HOV lane, even when I have a car full of people. And then there is the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. On the bridge, without a pass, you have to stop at the toll booth. Same for the Seattle tunnel. So even the few times a year I need it, I'm glad to have it for convenience sake.

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Dee wrote:

I have one of those gizmo toll passes on my windshield. Here in Washington it is call "Good To Go!". 


In Illinois it's called an I-Pass.

 



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nytram wrote:

Life before fast food restaurants were mainstream.

m7jj3tz450h41.jpg?width=960&auto=webp&s=

 

Looks like my family when we moved to Florida.

smile

 


 And mine when we went down to Oxted for the beer festival. Dad was teetotal but mum was a bit religious and obeyed 1 Timothy 5:23. But before that she went into full Lady of the Manor mode. The table was a folding wallpaperer's  pasting table which was not a bad start. But then  she put a cloth on it and the knives and forks and and soup spoons (soup came out of the thermos. Stone cold but did we dare complain?) and napkins and such a palaver you have never seen in all your born days.

We would have been much happier sitting on the running board of the motor but it was mum's day out and that was that. And at the end of it the old man would say, "Ah Ada May, that was a feast fit for the angels," because he was a happily married man and intended to stay that way

 



-- Edited by rumbletum on Sunday 16th of February 2020 12:26:53 PM

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In '66 we drove up the Alaska Highway called the ALCAN and then down the Kenai Peninsula to Homer Alaska and then returned to New Mexico. The Alaska Highway was gravel from Ft St John in B.C. onward and there were no rest stops so at lunchtime, we often pulled off beside an unnamed lake or stream and ate while the 3 kids and the dog ran around and worked off a bit of energy. Just before we left southern California we adopted a 6-week old orange kitten. In southern BC he made his first kill, a chipmunk in the rest area beside the road. I suppose he was a bit bigger than the chipmunk but not much. After that, there was no stopping him; he caught his lunch every day after that, usually a mouse or a shrew. Of course he was busy every night too, sometimes catching more than he could eat so he would store the extras in the tent with us. Of course we praised him and that made the dog (German Shepherd) jealous so one evening the dog went out and caught a mouse and brought it back to us, dropped it at our feet with a look of disgust, then went out and caught another for us. Of course we praised her too but she never bothered to catch again.

We didn't have a station wagon, just a new VW bus but the function was the same.

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Timetrvlr wrote:

In '66 we drove up the Alaska Highway called the ALCAN and then down the Kenai Peninsula to Homer Alaska and then returned to New Mexico. The Alaska Highway was gravel from Ft St John in B.C. onward and there were no rest stops so at lunchtime, we often pulled off beside an unnamed lake or stream and ate while the 3 kids and the dog ran around and worked off a bit of energy. Just before we left southern California we adopted a 6-week old orange kitten. In southern BC he made his first kill, a chipmunk in the rest area beside the road. I suppose he was a bit bigger than the chipmunk but not much. After that, there was no stopping him; he caught his lunch every day after that, usually a mouse or a shrew. Of course he was busy every night too, sometimes catching more than he could eat so he would store the extras in the tent with us. Of course we praised him and that made the dog (German Shepherd) jealous so one evening the dog went out and caught a mouse and brought it back to us, dropped it at our feet with a look of disgust, then went out and caught another for us. Of course we praised her too but she never bothered to catch again.

We didn't have a station wagon, just a new VW bus but the function was the same.


 biggrinbiggrin



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