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Post Info TOPIC: First Public Broadcast was 110 years ago today


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First Public Broadcast was 110 years ago today
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 It was on 13 January 1910 and was from the Metropolitan Opera House in New York

Dunno if this is the original but here is Enrico Caruso giving it loads anyway



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The history of television is fascinating.
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Mechanical Televisions in the 1800s and Early 1900s

Prior to electric televisions, we had mechanical televisions.

These early televisions started appearing in the early 1800s. They involved mechanically scanning images then transmitting those images onto a screen. Compared to electronic televisions, they were extremely rudimentary.

One of the first mechanical televisions used a rotating disk with holes arranged in a spiral pattern. This device was created independently by two inventors: Scottish inventor John Logie Baird and American inventor Charles Francis Jenkins. Both devices were invented in the early 1920s.

Prior to these two inventors, German inventor Paul Gottlieb Nipkow had developed the first mechanical television. That device sent images through wires using a rotating metal disk. Instead of calling the device a television, however, Nipkow called it an "electric telescope". The device had 18 lines of resolution.

In 1907, two inventors - Russian Boris Rosing and English A.A. Campbell-Swinton - combined a cathode ray tube with a mechanical scanning system to create a totally new television system.

Ultimately, the early efforts of these inventors would lead to the world's first electrical television a few years later.

The First Electronic Television was Invented in 1927

The world's first electronic television was created by a 21 year old inventor named Philo Taylor Farnsworth. That inventor lived in a house without electricity until he was age 14. Starting in high school, he began to think of a system that could capture moving images, transform those images into code, then move those images along radio waves to different devices.

Farnsworth was miles ahead of any mechanical television system invented to-date. Farnsworth's system captured moving images using a beam of electrons (basically, a primitive camera).

The first image ever transmitted by television was a simple line. Later, Farnsworth would famously transmit a dollar sign using his television after a prospective investor asked "When are we going to see some dollars in this thing, Farnsworth?"

Between 1926 and 1931, mechanical television inventors continued to tweak and test their creations. However, they were all doomed to be obsolete in comparison to modern electrical televisions: by 1934, all TVs had been converted into the electronic system.

The First Television Stations in America

The world's first television stations first started appearing in America in the late 1920s and early 1930s.

The first mechanical TV station was called W3XK and was created by Charles Francis Jenkins (one of the inventors of the mechanical television). That TV station aired its first broadcast on July 2, 1928.

One of the world's first television stations, WRGB, has the honor of being the world's only continuously operating station since 1926 to the modern day.

The First Television Sets in America

America's first commercially produced television sets were based on the mechanical television system - made by John Baird's television designs. These sets were shown off to the public in September, 1928.

It would take until 1938, however, before American electronic television sets were produced and released commercially. They were an instant hit after release.

The First Remote Control for Television Sets

The world's first television remote control was called the Tele Zoom, and it can barely even be categorized as a remote control. The Tele Zoom was only used to "zoom in" to the picture on the television. You could not use it to change any channels or turn the TV on or off. The Tele Zoom was released in 1948.

The first "true" remote control was produced by Zenith and released in 1955. This remote control could turn the television on or off and change the channel. It was also completely wireless.

The First Television Program in America

Today, American networks play thousands of different programs every day. Every single one of these programs, however, owes its existence to America's first television program, which was called The Queen's Messenger. That program was first shown in 1928 by WRGB station.

We're not 100% sure that The Queen's Messenger was the first TV program shown in America. In 1928, the program was thought to be broadcast only to four television sets. Not 400. Not 4,000. Four. Thus, we have some ambiguity and debate over whether this was actually the first television program.

America's First Television Commercial

The first television station in America started broadcasting in 1928. For the first 13 years of its existence, television remained blissfully commercial-free. The first commercial broadcast in America did not take place until July 1, 1941, which is when the first American advertisement aired. The ad was for a Bulova watch and lasted for 10 seconds. It aired on NBC.

https://bebusinessed.com/history/history-of-the-television/

 



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First Public Broadcast was 110 years ago today
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First MLB broadcast was at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, in the late summer of 1939. The Dodgers had to tint the baseballs yellow so they could be seen better.

Charlie

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The first TV images were described by a journalist in 1926 as 'faint and often blurred'
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John-Logie-Baird.jpg?w660

The first known photograph of a moving image.

  Produced by Baird's "televisor", as reported in The Times, 28 January 1926 (The subject is Baird's business partner Oliver Hutchinson.)

 

In early 1923, and in poor health, Baird moved to 21 Linton Crescent, Hastings, on the south coast of England. He later rented a workshop in the Queen's Arcade in the town. Baird built what was to become the world's first working television set using items including an old hatbox and a pair of scissors, some darning needles, a few bicycle light lenses, a used tea chest, and sealing wax and glue that he purchased. In February 1924, he demonstrated to the Radio Times that a semi-mechanical analogue television system was possible by transmitting moving silhouette images. In July of the same year, he received a 1000-volt electric shock, but survived with only a burnt hand, and as a result his landlord, Mr Tree, asked him to vacate the premises.[20] Baird gave the first public demonstration of moving silhouette images by television at Selfridges department store in London in a three-week series of demonstrations beginning on 25 March 1925.

In his laboratory on 2 October 1925, Baird successfully transmitted the first television picture with a greyscale image: the head of a ventriloquist's dummy nicknamed "Stooky Bill" in a 30-line vertically scanned image, at five pictures per second. Baird went downstairs and fetched an office worker, 20-year-old William Edward Taynton, to see what a human face would look like, and Taynton became the first person to be televised in a full tonal range. Looking for publicity, Baird visited the Daily Express newspaper to promote his invention. The news editor was terrified and he was quoted by one of his staff as saying: "For God's sake, go down to reception and get rid of a lunatic who's down there. He says he's got a machine for seeing by wireless! Watch him, he may have a razor on him."

The first known photograph of a moving image produced by Baird's "televisor", as reported in The Times, 28 January 1926 (The subject is Baird's business partner Oliver Hutchinson.)

 
On 26 January 1926, Baird repeated the transmission for members of the Royal Institution and a reporter from The Times in his laboratory at 22 Frith Street in the Soho district of London, where Bar Italia is now located. By this time, he had improved the scan rate to 12.5 pictures per second. It was the first demonstration of a television system that could broadcast live moving images with tone graduation.

 

 



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